My Surf

  • My Profile
  • My Travel Map
  • My Surfed Spots
  • My Sessions
  • My Trips
  • My Pictures
  • My Messages
  • My Blog
  • Add new blog

Teiki Mathieu Baillan surfing a self-made Alaia surfboard in Lances Left, Mentawaï, Indonesia. Photo by C. Naslain, 2009.

Surf spot atlas made by surfers for surfers
Enjoy and contribute!

 Azores

Europe

Video 1 of 3

Show all (3)...

It's not the right surf spot? Hoax? Copyright Infringement? Tell us !

Surf Spot: Ribeira grande

Title : Smoke & Mirrors - Surfing In The Archipelago of the Azores

Description : Chris Drummy surfing in the Azores. The Archipelago of the Azores (UK /əˈzɔrz/ ə-zorz, US /ˈeɪzɔrz/ ay-zorz; Portuguese: Açores, IPA: [ɐˈsoɾɨʃ]) is composed of nine volcanic islands situated in the North Atlantic Ocean, and is located about 1,500 km (930 mi) west of Lisbon and about 1,900 km (1,200 mi) southeast of Newfoundland. The islands, and their Exclusive Economic Zone, form the Autonomous Region of the Azores, one of the two autonomous regions of Portugal. Its main industries are agriculture, dairy farming (for cheese and butter products primarily), livestock ranching, fishing, and tourism, which is becoming the major service activity in the region. In addition to this, the government of the Azores employs a large percentage of the population directly or indirectly in many aspects of the service and tertiary sectors. There are nine major Azores islands and an islet cluster, in three main groups. These are Flores and Corvo, to the west; Graciosa, Terceira, São Jorge, Pico, and Faial in the centre; and São Miguel, Santa Maria, and the Formigas Reef to the east. They extend for more than 600 km (370 mi) and lie in a northwest-southeast direction. The vast extent of the islands defines an immense exclusive economic zone of 1,100,000 km2 (420,000 sq mi). The westernmost point of this area is 3,380 km (2,100 mi) from the North American continent. All the islands have volcanic origins, although some, such as Santa Maria, have had no recorded activity since the islands were settled. Mount Pico, on the island of Pico, is the highest point in Portugal, at 2,351 m (7,713 ft). The Azores are actually some of the tallest mountains on the planet, measured from their base at the bottom of the ocean to their peaks, which thrust high above the surface of the Atlantic. Because these once-uninhabited and remote islands were settled sporadically over a span of two centuries, their culture, dialect, cuisine, and traditions vary considerably. Aviation in the Azores Each of the nine islands has an airfield,[39] although the majority are aerodromes rather than airports. The commercial terminals in Ponta Delgada, Horta, Vila do Porto and Santa Cruz das Flores are operated by ANA -- Aeroportos de Portugal, a public entity that oversees the operations of airports across Portugal. The remaining, except for Lajes Field, are operated by the Regional Government. Lajes is a military airbase, as well as a commercial airport, and is operated by the Portuguese Armed Forces in conjunction with the United States. The airports are: Santa Maria: Santa Maria Airport (LPAZ) Sao Miguel: João Paulo II Airport (LPPD) Terceira: Lajes Field (LPLA) Lajes Air Base (Portuguese Airforce and United States Air Force) Sao Jorge: São Jorge Airport (LPSJ) Pico: Pico Airport (LPPI) Faial: Horta Airport (LPHR) Graciosa: Graciosa Airport (LPGR) Flores: Flores Airport (LPFL) Corvo: Corvo Airport (LPCR)

Tags :

Rating : 5.00

Duration : 00:02:20

Video submitted by Anonymous (20-02-2013)

Advertise

On the Go!

Wannasurf.com on your mobile

RSS All the RSS feeds of Wannasurf.com

Newsletter All news by email

Friends of Wannasurf

Wannasurf Online Shop