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Teiki Mathieu Baillan surfing a self-made Alaia surfboard in Lances Left, Mentawaï, Indonesia. Photo by C. Naslain, 2009.

Surf spot atlas made by surfers for surfers
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 Samoa Western

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By riccinzl , 12-09-2007

will the real inbred idiot please stand up - well it is a shame that there are people out there who add nothing to Samoa’s image than complaints about those who live here and misguided information about surf breaks and surf camps. Being a Samoan myself I would have to say that sure there are many expats from overseas who now regard themselves as locals, but, they are trying their best not only to protect Samoa from surf exploitation, but to also help develop the young and upcoming surfers from this small nation. A case in point is the many competitions that are held for these youngsters who can't afford surfboards let alone boardies, rashies and leashes. Donations or meaalofa or in translation "gifts of love" are but one of the mainstays of keeping local Samoan’s surfing and without it you can guarantee we would have no surfers competing at a national level. An important example is the recent 2007 South Pacific Games surfing competition held in Savaii last month. Without the support of the local inbreds this competition would have clearly not been the success that it was, not only did we have an temporary inbred coach, but we had several inbred Judges from around the Pacific, some who also participate in the WCT events. Our local boys came close to medals, however, our medal hopeful was up against the reigning 6 time Euro Champ and World title holder. Thank goodness at least that he was able to get some training and a board to at least have a shot – the experience he got comes around only every four years. For those who weren't aware check the Samoa Surf Association website for the results www.samoasurfer.com
In general it doesn't matter what the locals say about Samoa but the truth is to really have an appreciation for these islands you will need to visit it rather than read the ramblings of those who have really nothing better to do than be destructive and negative towards locals surfing in Samoa. With regard to the surf camps there is enough info and comments made in the past, however, what has been omitted is that the camp promoted by the previous gentleman did not tell you is they are the only camp that does not limit their guests numbers. All other surf camps limit their numbers to avoid overcrowding apart from them. So if you want to stay with them then be prepared to surf with 20 plus guys in the water at any one time, with no trained water personnel crewing their boats and no first aid or rescue contingencies in place at all. Check their boat prices beforehand as well cos they are no way near the prices stated earlier. What the local inbreds and myself see for the future in Samoa is a sustainable surfing environment where everyone gets waves and the place doesn’t turn into Indo or Hawaii. Samoa is perhaps one of the last unexploited surf bastions on the planet that can be protected in this way and we would rather have people to understand and help us with this rather than fight against us and blow it all out. Have a good day, Faafetai
Peace

By Anonymous , 18-08-2007

Bushman - I have just returned from Samoa and it is a fantastic place. YOu need to do some exploring to find the right setup for yourself. An with that you can stay at dirt cheap family Fales with surf (paddle) out front and you can stay at resorts and have a flash time. I suggest a good mix of all the experiences. If you have a car you can feasibly stay in Apia and surf everyday too. The swell really needs to be a big South wester for the Upolu south shore. Those are generated by the big snowmaking lows that cruise past the bottom of NZ. I had some good days and not so good for surf, the wind was the biggest influence. It aint like Indo, but then, it aint Indo. Respect tthe locals, explore and you will find Samoa very rewarding.

By Anonymous , 28-07-2007

Inbred expat 'locals' are idiots - Most of the expats in Samoa who like to refer to themselves as locals are actually inbred idiots who somehow think that Samoa is their own little surf Kingdom. They would like to keep all other surfers out except, of course, for the ones they or their friends provide surf tours to (effing hypocrites). Most of the real Samoan surfers, on the other hand, are cool and quite willing to share their waves with visiting surfers. As far as I know, unlike Hawaii and Tahiti Samoa doesn't have much of a legacy of surfing although there is at least one ancient Samoan legend in which surfing plays a central role (surfing at Va'oto). Big name surf resorts (Salani, Aganoa) are way over-priced and over-hyped. Why pay big bucks when the Trade Winds may blow incessantly for your whole trip? (Trade Wind season is their busiest time of year because it coincides with summer vacations in the states). On Upolu check out Maninoa (Siumu) as they have made significant improvements as of late including a boat tour out to nearby breaks including Boulders for something like $20 tala extra if you are staying there (more if you just want the boat ride). Surf tours through Moanalei (Lalomanu) are a bit pricy ($150 tala) but potentially good including a baot out to some offshore islands. You can surf a lot of breaks from the shore but it helps to get a good orientation so I would start at one of those two places and go from there. No I don't work for any surf resort, just like to pass on the info to independant surfers and also piss off expat locals aka a**holes. Here is some info from a surf guide I wrote for independant surfers when I lived there: 20) Sa’aga/Aganoa: Large, beautiful bay with several wave options. To access Sa’aga/Aganoa as you travel west look for a toll road (small fee) just before you cross bridge before you enter Sa’aga-fou village. Turn left. This road is extremely rough and recommended for 4W drive vehicles only. In fact, if there have been recent heavy rains it will likely be totally impassable. After about 2-3 Ks it comes out onto the bay. Directly in front is an extremely shallow RH break known as ‘Skin Grafts’. Only surf on smaller days at HT (**). About 300M to the west is a series of LH breaks that can be good on more easterly swells, MT-HT (**), while another LH break lies about 200M further out that works on larger swells and LT (**). The biggest attraction here, though, is ‘Boulders’, a long LH peeling off the point and into the bay (but with a shallow inside section). Boulders can hold up to 20+ foot faces easily and, in fact, should only be surfed when it’s at least 5’, because when smaller it breaks dangerously close to the rocks at the base of the cliff, and if a large cleanup set should suddenly appear out of nowhere you are gonna’ get worked. Can be surfed on Sundays. Easterly Trades are offshore. HT/MT dropping is best. (**/***) 21) Si’umu (Coconuts): Turn left when the South Coast Rd. intersects the Cross Island Rd.. A short distance down the road is a beautiful beach situated on a large bay. There are 3 LHs out in the middle of the bay, all within paddling distance (Note: These waves can also be easily accessed by paddling from Maninoa Surf Camp). The closest and furthest out are intense waves best surfed on smaller to mid-sized swells at HT only and in good wind conditions. Can be surfed on Sundays. (**/***)
Happy wave hunting!!!

By akkouel@yahoo.fr , 25-07-2007

break accesses ? - You can't imagine how happy I am to discover in your messages that one CAN SURF SAMOA WITHOUT STAYING AT A RESORT !!! :) :) :) It's not like I have something against them, it's just that I don't have that much money. So you guys say we can actually come there, rent a 4WD, stay at hotels or local's places, paddle to breaks, with breaks being not exclusive propriety of resorts... I mean, doing a REAL SURF TRIP ??? I'd be happy to get in touch with people that did that to have their advice and infos. Don't hesitate to send me a mail, I am the most local-respectful surfer you ever seen and would enjoy paying you back welcoming you in New Zealand... alex

By Anonymous , 19-07-2007

Whats with the Agro. - Whats with the agro on these messages about Samoa. Just about everybody here that posts thinks they know everything better than the next bloke just because they have been there. Samoa and its people are so beautiful and layed back that all this crap just doesn't do it justice. Know matter where you traven in the world there will be independent travellers who like to get out and explore and there will be travellers who like convenience and pre arranged itineraries. Samoa certainly caters for all with some good surf camps and some great hidden gems.

Fa'a Samoa.

By is total BS , 17-07-2007

Surfing Samoa, 1876 - Locals surfing Samoa in 1867? That's really funny - sounds like some random websurfer is hoping to rewrite surfing histrory, but the fact is, he's full of it! Dont you think if people were surfing Samoa in 1867, by now it would be like in Hawaii? I mean, at least there would still be a few surfers keeping up the tradition, or old relic boards discovered laying around. But fact is, when westerners FIRST started surfing the Samoas in the mid-1960s (not 1860s, boneheads) there were NO local surfers ANYWHERE - not one! Nor were any old wood boards ever found. Face it, your hypothesis, while compelling, lacks all evidence. If you have an old picture of someone surfing Apia Harbor in 1867 as you say, by now its been over 100 years so that picture is in the public domain, ie.e - copyrights no longer apply. So you have no excuse not to post it here to prove yourself. Otherwise, shut your trap and stop (re)inventing history! Oh yeah, about the surf camps - convenient if you want to dish out the talas, but ultimately they have nothing to do with surfing in Samoa. Just because there's a McDonalds in Apia does not mean they define what it means to travel to or live in Samoa. Anyone can set up a business there, big deal? It doesn't mean you have to be a patron or buy into their pretended surf monmopoly lockdown.

By riccinzl , 15-07-2007

Mutha's bit o paradise - Sorry everyone, beware of the line up being crowded by Samoan Groms on freezer doors...ha ha.By the way just out of curiosity, who is getting the money you so diligently claim that you pay? Is it the village, their church, the local school who can't afford even one computer, the fishermen in the lagoon, the airline, rental car company, hotel, restaurant or the land taxes you pay on your bit of paradise? I guess our money doesn't pay for too much then we compare it to your credit card bill. Relax Grom Aussie, as I said earlier, you'll get your fair share of waves...and no one is stopping anyone from that, but repsect for locals is the only thing we ask you to bring. I'm sure after 8 times here you would understand that paradise is a place to be kept...and not one to be expected...Peace

By riccinzl , 12-07-2007

mutha's bit of paradise - Nice one grom aussie. Your astuteness on picking up on the most trivial bits of a report and trying to turn it into something important enforces the typcial Aussie stereotype that you have here...lol. Sorry everyone, beware of the line up being crowded by Samoan Groms on freezer doors...ha ha. (BTW ask Nick the manager from Salani if you need evidence of that statement) Actually, I have plans to close the airport shortly to stop planes landing here with people ready to surf Samoan breaks...he he. By the way just out of curiosity, who is getting the money you so diligently claim that you pay? Is it the village, their church, the local school who can't afford even one computer, the fishermen in the lagoon, the airline, rental car company, hotel, restaurant or the land taxes you pay on your bit of paradise? I guess our money doesn't pay for too much then we compare it to your credit card bill. Relax Grom Aussie, as I said earlier, you'll get your fair share of waves...and no one is stopping anyone from that, but repsect for locals is the only thing we ask you to bring. I'm sure after 8 times here you would understand that paradise is a place to be kept...and not one to be expected...Peace

By Anonymous , 11-07-2007

- With regarding the comment that Samoa has no true local surfers and colonists "introduced" surfing to samoa. Several books on early colonial samoa have photos & drawings of people surfing in Apia harbor, one sketch I found was from 1876. True it is a tradition that has declined over the years but in most villages with a break close to shore you will always find a group of kids going for a faase'e when theres a good swell. Last week Luatuanuu village held a surf comp exclusively for local village surfers and had an excellent turn out.

By Duble d , 23-06-2007

samasamoa - its a good place warm & relaxing, good powerful reef waves, some boat trips required to some breaks, VERY WINDY AT TIMES...can wreck even the most protected wave, cheaper alternatives to stay than surf camps...though Aganoa is fairly cheap and good value. Steer clear of coconuts surf package its a rort. get a car if u can afford to hire one. be kind to locals they are very friendly. great snorkelling & fishing

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